There is a lot of conflicting information out there about dairy. On the one hand, it is a great source of calories, protein and vitamins. On the other hand, it is also a major source of saturated fat and cholesterol, which can raise the risk of disease. Task: There are seven questions to answer in your intro. Answer them in your intro paragraph. 1. What is dairy? 2. What does dairy have to offer? 3. Why is dairy bad for you? 4. Why is dairy good for you? 5. Is there a better way to get the benefits of dairy? 6. What are the pros and cons of dairy? 7. What are the benefits and risks of dairy?

Dairy is a surprisingly divisive food. Many people, including health experts, swear that it’s an essential part of a healthy diet. They point to the fact that it’s a complete protein, has a high rate of absorption, is an excellent source of calcium, and contains several other minerals and vitamins. However, others say dairy is one of the worst things you can put in your body, and many more point out that it’s extremely high in fat and sugar.

The history of dairy goes back thousands of years, but has recently become a subject of controversy. Can it be good or bad for you? The debate on whether to consume dairy is ongoing, with both sides producing studies and statistics to support their viewpoints.

We’re often asked whether dairy is healthy or harmful. The short answer is that it depends. We’ll help you make sense of the studies — and the widely differing viewpoints — in this post, and we’ll give you all the information you need to determine whether dairy is right for you.

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Is dairy a “good” or “bad” food?

Is dairy a “good” or “bad” food?

We have eaten dairy (in some form or another) as a species for millennia.

Milk has been regarded as “good for humans” for ages. The slogan for a series of advertisements in the 1980s was “Milk: It Does A Body Good.” If you Google “vintage milk advertisements,” you’ll discover that touting the health advantages of milk has a long history.

People nowadays aren’t that sure. Some argue that milk is high in “bad” fat, harmful chemicals, hormones, and difficult-to-digest proteins. That it’ll harm your GI tract, cause acne, make you a mucus-y mess, and increase your cancer risk.

People nowadays aren’t that sure. Some argue that milk is high in “bad” fat, harmful chemicals, hormones, and difficult-to-digest proteins. That it’ll harm your GI tract, cause acne, make you a mucus-y mess, and increase your cancer risk.

The good news is that milk and dairy have a lot of science behind them.

The good news is that milk and dairy have a lot of science behind them.

That’s why, in this article, we’ll look at what research says about dairy, what it doesn’t say, and where it’s undecided. Then, based on that scientific data, YOU can make a decision that is in line with YOUR objectives and requirements.

That’s why, in this article, we’ll look at what research says about dairy, what it doesn’t say, and where it’s undecided. Then, based on that scientific data, YOU can make a decision that is in line with YOUR objectives and requirements.

  • What exactly is in milk?
  • What exactly is in milk?
  • What exactly is in milk?
  • How do agricultural and processing methods affect the nutritional content of milk?
  • How do agricultural and processing methods affect the nutritional content of milk?
  • Is dairy suitable for you as a person?

Is dairy suitable for you as a person?

This is a complete article. It’s like, very thorough; it’s about 10,000 words long. If you don’t want to take a deep dive into dairy but still want to know the key takeaways, follow the steps below.

This is a complete article. It’s like, very thorough; it’s about 10,000 words long. If you don’t want to take a deep dive into dairy but still want to know the key takeaways, follow the steps below.

Do you want to know which dairy products are the healthiest?

Do you want to know which dairy products are the healthiest?

Do you want to know the facts so you can make an informed choice regarding dairy?

Let’s get started.

Let’s get started.

Let’s begin with a crucial point:

Let’s begin with a crucial point:

The majority of the milk used to make dairy products in North America comes from cows, but you may find goat and sheep milk products such as cheese and yogurt at your local supermarket.

(In other parts of the globe, goat and sheep milk products are more prevalent.) In Italy, buffalo milk mozzarella (mozzarella di bufala) has long been a favorite. You may find yak milk and butter on the table in rural Mongolia. You may even get a small high from the alcohol in fermented horse milk if you’re in the Central Asian steppes.)

Milk is a mixture of water, proteins, carbohydrates, minerals, and vitamins in its natural state. Its nutritional composition mirrors the animal from which it came (fun fact!). Seal milk contains approximately 50% fat!) as well as the diet of the animal.

Milk is a mixture of water, proteins, carbohydrates, minerals, and vitamins in its natural state. Its nutritional composition mirrors the animal from which it came (fun fact!). Seal milk contains approximately 50% fat!) as well as the diet of the animal.

Dairy must be pasteurized in certain areas to eliminate harmful bacteria. In other places (such as France), dairy may be unpasteurized in some forms, such as raw milk cheese.

Here’s a quick calorie comparison of a few dairy products: And here’s the percentage of calories from fat, protein, and carbohydrate in each source: The percentage of calories from fat, protein, and carbohydrate in each source

Not everyone is created equal (in their ability to tolerate dairy).

Not everyone is created equal (in their ability to tolerate dairy).

Not everyone is created equal (in their ability to tolerate dairy).

Dairy may also be chosen (or avoided) based on taste, dietary preferences, culture and history, animal product consumption preferences, cleanliness, and a number of other factors.

Dairy may also be chosen (or avoided) based on taste, dietary preferences, culture and history, animal product consumption preferences, cleanliness, and a number of other factors.

What exactly is in dairy?

What exactly is in dairy?

  • fatty acids, for example:
    • Fats are classified as saturated, monounsaturated, or unsaturated.
    • Fats are classified as saturated, monounsaturated, or unsaturated.
    • A fatty acid having diabetes-protective effects, trans-palmitoleic acid
  • A fatty acid having diabetes-protective effects, trans-palmitoleic acid
  • protein sources include:
    • casein
    • whey
    • protein sources include:
  • minerals that include:
    • calcium
    • Magnesium is a mineral that is required for a variety of bodily functions, including bone health.
    • Magnesium is a mineral that is required for a variety of bodily functions, including bone health.
    • potassium is a mineral that aids in the proper functioning of your neurological and cardiovascular systems.
  • potassium is a mineral that aids in the proper functioning of your neurological and cardiovascular systems.
    • vitamin A is a powerful antioxidant.
    • D-vitamin
    • Vitamin K2 is an important nutrient for bone and cardiovascular health, as well as for regulating gene expression.
  • Vitamin K2 is an important nutrient for bone and cardiovascular health, as well as for regulating gene expression.
    • riboflavin, a B vitamin that promotes energy and a healthy metabolism
    • riboflavin, a B vitamin that promotes energy and a healthy metabolism
  • Iodine is required for the production of thyroid hormone.

Iodine is required for the production of thyroid hormone.

Fatty acids are a kind of fatty acid.

Fatty acids are a kind of fatty acid.

  • which animal is responsible for the production of dairy;
  • which animal is responsible for the production of dairy;
  • the nutrition and grazing habits of the animal;
  • the nutrition and grazing habits of the animal;
  • when the milk was gathered; what season the milk was collected in;
  • when the milk was gathered; what season the milk was collected in;
  • the amount of sunshine it received;

the amount of sunshine it received;

Cows that are grass-fed, for example, have substantially more beneficial fatty acids than cows that are fed conventionally: two to five times more conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and 62 percent more omega-3 fatty acids.

The fat content of milk is also determined by how it is processed after it is collected. The fat level of skim milk (almost nil) differs significantly from that of Brie cheese or full milk.

The fat content of milk is also determined by how it is processed after it is collected. The fat level of skim milk (almost nil) differs significantly from that of Brie cheese or full milk.

One of the biggest benefits of dairy is its high protein content. Around 80% of the protein in cow’s milk comes from the casein family of molecules.

Casein is a high-quality, slow-digesting protein that’s often suggested for muscle growth and fat loss. It may have antioxidant effects and immune boosting properties; it may reduce triglycerides and high blood pressure.

Casein is a high-quality, slow-digesting protein that’s often suggested for muscle growth and fat loss. It may have antioxidant effects and immune boosting properties; it may reduce triglycerides and high blood pressure.

Nutrition geeks, take note: A1 and A2 beta-casein

As with fats, different breeds of animals produce different subtypes of casein molecules (notably, A1 beta-casein & A2 beta-casein). Some research suggests that the different types of molecules may have different health effects.

For example, a limited amount of observational research (mainly in animals) indicates that A1 beta-casein may have a role in type 1 diabetes and heart disease development. There’s also some evidence that milk with A1 beta-casein may cause more digestive problems than milk with just A2 beta-casein.

For example, a limited amount of observational research (mainly in animals) indicates that A1 beta-casein may have a role in type 1 diabetes and heart disease development. There’s also some evidence that milk with A1 beta-casein may cause more digestive problems than milk with just A2 beta-casein.

Other research, particularly in humans, have shown no such links between casein / casomorphins, illness, and/or addictive behaviors.

Other research, particularly in humans, have shown no such links between casein / casomorphins, illness, and/or addictive behaviors.

Bottom line: There isn’t enough evidence to link A1 beta-casein to type 1 diabetes, heart disease, digestive problems, or your cheese addiction. It is, without a doubt, more complex than that.

Bottom line: There isn’t enough evidence to link A1 beta-casein to type 1 diabetes, heart disease, digestive problems, or your cheese addiction. It is, without a doubt, more complex than that.

The most well-known protein is whey, which is the second kind of protein found in milk. If you’ve ever had a protein shake, you’ve probably had whey protein powder.

The most well-known protein is whey, which is the second kind of protein found in milk. If you’ve ever had a protein shake, you’ve probably had whey protein powder.

  • triglyceride levels that are lower
  • enhance the function of our arteries and veins
  • enhance the function of our arteries and veins
  • enhance antioxidant capacity in total (by increasing glutathione levels).

enhance antioxidant capacity in total (by increasing glutathione levels).

Although most of the study on this subject has been done in rats or as observational studies on people, there is some contradictory data regarding whey protein and cancer.

Some data indicates that whey protein may help to prevent cancer and slow the progression of existing malignancies. However, some data indicates that whey may speed up the development of existing tumors in certain instances.

Some data indicates that whey protein may help to prevent cancer and slow the progression of existing malignancies. However, some data indicates that whey may speed up the development of existing tumors in certain instances.

For the most part, the recognized advantages of whey exceed any potential dangers.

For the most part, the recognized advantages of whey exceed any potential dangers.

Calcium allows our muscles to contract, our blood to clot, and our nerves to send signals, in addition to being important for bone health. Calcium absorption is essential, but calcium retention is much more so. (Read more about bone health for additional information.)

Calcium allows our muscles to contract, our blood to clot, and our nerves to send signals, in addition to being important for bone health. Calcium absorption is essential, but calcium retention is much more so. (Read more about bone health for additional information.)

In many parts of the world, cow’s milk is a very small part of the average diet, yet diseases associated with calcium deficiency (like osteoporosis) are uncommon. Calcium is obtained instead from cabbage family leafy greens (particularly when cooked), calcium-set tofu, beans, certain nuts and seeds, fish with bones, and even some seaweeds.

In many parts of the world, cow’s milk is a very small part of the average diet, yet diseases associated with calcium deficiency (like osteoporosis) are uncommon. Calcium is obtained instead from cabbage family leafy greens (particularly when cooked), calcium-set tofu, beans, certain nuts and seeds, fish with bones, and even some seaweeds.

Fat-soluble vitamins: A & D

Vitamins A and D are fat-soluble vitamins.

Milk is now fortified with additional vitamins A and D, thanks to the development of industrial agriculture and processing, as well as a greater awareness of nutritional inadequacies. This is less crucial in affluent countries like the United States or the UK, but important in poorer regions of the globe where malnutrition remains a real concern.

Milk is now fortified with additional vitamins A and D, thanks to the development of industrial agriculture and processing, as well as a greater awareness of nutritional inadequacies. This is less crucial in affluent countries like the United States or the UK, but important in poorer regions of the globe where malnutrition remains a real concern.

Vitamin D is primarily obtained through sunlight, although it may also be found in tiny quantities in eggs, mushrooms, and fish liver. You may also take D-vitamin supplements if they aren’t enough.

Vitamin D is primarily obtained through sunlight, although it may also be found in tiny quantities in eggs, mushrooms, and fish liver. You may also take vitamin D supplements if they aren’t enough.

  • Carotenoids and retinoids found in plant foods such as carrots, sweet potatoes, and spinach, as well as cabbage family leafy greens, provide an excellent source of calcium (mustard greens, collard greens, turnips greens, and kale).
  • Carotenoids and retinoids found in plant foods such as carrots, sweet potatoes, and spinach, as well as cabbage family leafy greens, provide an excellent source of calcium (mustard greens, collard greens, turnips greens, and kale).

Hormones

Yes, milk contains hormones. This is true even with organic milk. Let’s have a look at them right now.

Yes, milk contains hormones. This is true even with organic milk. Let’s have a look at them right now.

To produce milk, a mammal must be pregnant the majority of the time. Dairy animals are thus in various stages of pregnancy and lactation, which can affect their milk’s hormone content.

To produce milk, a mammal must be pregnant the majority of the time. Dairy animals are thus in various stages of pregnancy and lactation, which can affect their milk’s hormone content.

Higher estrogen levels in the blood have been related to some kinds of cancer, notably breast cancer in women and prostate cancer in men, as well as recurrence of those diseases.

Higher estrogen levels in the blood have been related to some kinds of cancer, notably breast cancer in women and prostate cancer in men, as well as recurrence of those diseases.

Higher estrogen levels in the blood have been related to some kinds of cancer, notably breast cancer in women and prostate cancer in men, as well as recurrence of those diseases.

While the mice experiments have yet to be reproduced in people, other study has shown no link between estrogens in milk and cancer incidence or recurrence in humans.

While the mice experiments have yet to be reproduced in people, other study has shown no link between estrogens in milk and cancer incidence or recurrence in humans.

At the end of the day, dairy contains estrogens. However, there is no conclusive proof that these estrogens reach our circulation or have a detrimental impact on our health or development when ingested in milk or dairy.

Hormone supplements

Hormone supplements

This, like the estrogen discussion, has raised some eyebrows. Similarly, although those hormones may be found in milk, they do not become hormones in people. Rather, they are broken down into peptides (smaller protein pieces) and never reach our circulation.

This, like the estrogen discussion, has raised some eyebrows. Similarly, although those hormones may be found in milk, they do not become hormones in people. Rather, they are broken down into peptides (smaller protein pieces) and never reach our circulation.

Furthermore, in humans, these hormones have little biological action. Even if they did, they’re only present in trace quantities (approximately 1/1000 of a gram per liter of milk), with around 85-90 percent of them eliminated during pasteurization.

Furthermore, in humans, these hormones have little biological action. Even if they did, they’re only present in trace quantities (approximately 1/1000 of a gram per liter of milk), with around 85-90 percent of them eliminated during pasteurization.

IGF-1 is a hormone that supports all types of growth in the body — muscle, bone, and other tissues. In addition, dairy consumption seems to raise IGF-1 levels in people.

IGF-1 is a hormone that supports all types of growth in the body — muscle, bone, and other tissues. In addition, dairy consumption seems to raise IGF-1 levels in people.

IGF-1 is a hormone that supports all types of growth in the body — muscle, bone, and other tissues. In addition, dairy consumption seems to raise IGF-1 levels in people.

On the other hand, uncontrolled growth is not a good thing. Some people believe that IGF-1 may lead to malignant tumors.

In principle, this seems logical, however milk intake only results in a little increase in IGF-1 (about 2-10 percent above fasting levels). IGF-1 does not seem to be a factor in the formation of tumors.

Higher levels of IGF-1 may potentially help existing tumors grow faster, although research in this area is contradictory and mainly correlational or conducted in petri dishes (which do not represent the complicated reality of the human body).

In individuals with high levels of circulating IGF-1, eating low-fat dairy has been linked to a reduced risk of colorectal cancer, according to some studies. This contradicts the notion that milk raises IGF-1 levels, which promote cancer growth.

And all protein-rich meals, whether plant or animal-based, raise IGF-1 levels. So this isn’t only a problem with milk.

As a result, the IGF-1 link between dairy and cancer is neither constant nor robust.

Similarly, the notion that “milk contains all those terrible hormones” isn’t supported up by science.

What are the differences between the various kinds of dairy?

Most of us know that eating a container of cultured yogurt isn’t quite the same as eating a pint of ice cream. (Let’s be honest: after a breakup, has anybody ever picked a glass of skim milk to drown their sorrows?)

Dairy varieties vary depending on the following factors:

  • their macronutrient (fat, carbohydrate, and protein) and micronutrient (fat, carbohydrate, and protein) percentages (i.e., vitamins and minerals, specific fatty acids, etc.)
  • how easily they can be digested, and how fast they can be digested
  • their solid-to-liquid ratio

Everything from nearly pure fat (ghee, which is butter fat that has had the milk particles removed) to almost completely protein is available (e.g. casein and whey protein powders).

You may also consume dairy that has had various additives added to it, such as sugar, salt, emulsifiers, flavorings, and so on.

Milk

Breast milk is our first meal for the vast majority of us. Milk efficiently transports water and essential nutrients that humans need to develop.

Milk has also been an important agricultural crop for many people cultures. If your ancestors were dairy farmers, you may profit from milk and be able to digest it in the future (if you choose to consume it).

Including milk in a calorie-restricted diet may assist to build muscle mass, reduce body fat, and improve nutritional intake (protein, calcium, potassium, vitamin D). Adding milk to a diet that isn’t low in calcium doesn’t appear to have the same impact.

Milk may be an efficient method to replace fluids, electrolytes, and amino acids after workouts due to its relatively high water content. Furthermore, there is no obvious connection between milk intake and any illnesses or health issues at the population level.

That isn’t to say that milk will always be good (or bad) for everyone, all of the time. The data is conflicting, and the fact that different people react to milk in different ways certainly adds to the confusion.

The verdict is in:

  • Milk may be tolerated and beneficial to certain people, therefore they prefer to consume it. Some people can’t and won’t.
  • If you want to drink milk, like with other meals, it’s generally best to do so in moderation, noting if it produces any symptoms and stopping if it does.

Yogurt, kefir, and other dairy products with a culture

If milk is not refrigerated, it will ferment due to naturally existing bacteria. Humans found this out a long time ago, and today yogurts, kefir, cultured cottage cheese, skyr, quark, and aged cheeses are made by intentionally allowing milk to ferment.

These bacterially fermented / cultured products seem to be the healthiest, safest, and most well-tolerated, and they vary significantly from uncultured dairy.

They include the following:

  • a large number of probiotic organisms (which seemingly make our gut happier and healthier)
  • Probiotic organisms generate bioactive lipids (fats).
  • lactose levels are decreased (since the bacteria tend to digest the sugars)
  • protein that is more readily digested
  • greater levels of certain nutrients that are good for you (like K2 is a kind of vitamin.)

Some studies that have shown elevated hazards with various dairy products have discovered that fermented dairy has the opposite effect, lowering risk.

For instance, regular yogurt consumption (along with other cultured and fermented dairy) appears to lower the risk of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease by improving GI tract health, reducing bodily inflammation, improving insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control, improving both innate and adaptive immune function, and being a satiating food (thanks to higher protein).

The conclusion: There is substantial evidence that cultured and fermented dairy products have many health advantages. If you wish, you may include them into your diet.

Cheese

The results on cheese have been varied, but one thing is certain: the kind of cheese matters.

Some cheeses are bacterially fermented/cultured and aged, and their ultimate form contains a lot of these beneficial bacteria. They have a nutritional profile that is comparable to that of yogurt.

Other processed cheeses (such as American, nacho cheese sauce, cheese products, and so on) don’t have this problem. Other ingredients, such as soybean oil and artificial colors and tastes, are included in several of these cheese varieties.

The verdict: Aged and cultured cheeses are likely to be beneficial to one’s health. If you wish, you may indulge in processed cheese on occasion.

Ghee and butter

Butter is a mixture of butterfat and milk solids, while ghee is butterfat without the milk solids (which makes it better for high-heat cooking, as there are no milk solids to burn).

While mainly saturated fats, they also include approximately a quarter monounsaturated fats and 4-5 percent polyunsaturated fats.

Although saturated fat isn’t the monster we previously believed it was, it doesn’t mean we can consume pounds of butter without consequences. (I apologize to BulletProof coffee drinkers.)

In addition, compared to other dairy meals, butter has less milk fat globule membrane due to the churning process. This membrane encloses the fat and seems to prevent it from influencing our blood cholesterol and lipoprotein levels adversely.

Butter, which has half the membrane levels of cream, may harm blood lipid health, while cream (or other high-fat dairy that hasn’t been mechanically emulsified) doesn’t seem to have the same effect.

You may have heard the term “buttery” used to describe a wine’s flavor. Butyric acid, a short-chain fatty acid molecule that is a result of bacterial fermentation and is present in all fresh dairy products and accounts for approximately 3-4 percent of butter, is responsible for the flavor.

Butyrates offer a long list of proven health advantages, including enhancing metabolic health, decreasing cancer cell development, and modulating immunity.

But, once again, this does not imply that butter is a magical supplement. Because our own gut bacteria produce butyrates from digesting carbohydrates, a high-fiber diet is more likely to provide us with the greatest butyric acid advantages.

The verdict: While a little amount of butter is OK, it is not a superfood. If you wish, you may enjoy it in little to moderate quantities.

Frozen treats and ice cream

Ice cream and frozen dairy-based sweets, for example, are definitely less nutritious than fresh cultured kefir.

Although some may include a little amount of protein or other minerals like calcium, they’re usually processed meals with sugar, salt, flavorings, oils, emulsifiers, and other ingredients that make them delicious and difficult to stop eating. (You may blame it on your mind.)

The verdict: If you wish, treat yourself to this as a once-in-a-while indulgence.

So, what effect does dairy have on your health?

The simple response to the question of dairy and health is this:

Health (or lack thereof) is the result of a complex interplay of numerous variables, including our general diets, activities, lives, environment, genetics, age, and so on.

Furthermore, nutritional research may be difficult.

As you read the following part, keep this in mind.

There is no such thing as “magic food” or “devil food” that will determine your health, fitness, or body composition. Dairy is a little component of a much larger picture.

Maintaining a healthy weight or losing weight

Dairy intake seems to help individuals lose weight or maintain a healthy weight in general. Yogurt and cultured dairy products seem to be the most beneficial.

This is most likely due to:

  • dairy’s high-quality protein, which may be filling (so we eat less overall)
  • calcium and magnesium are two examples of such nutrients.
  • various special chemicals found in yogurt and cultured dairy in particular, which may help with metabolic health, intestinal health, and other aspects of body composition.

The verdict: Dairy may be a beneficial component of a fat reduction or weight control program if you want to consume it.

Muscle gain and athletic performance

Dairy is particularly beneficial to those who want to develop or maintain muscular mass.

It contains a lot of whey and casein, which are two high-quality proteins. Both have been proven to be among the most efficient proteins for promoting muscle development due to their high content of necessary amino acids, which we can’t produce and must get via our diet.

Plus, if we need more calories to gain muscle or recover from strenuous exercises, dairy may be a wonderful source of extra energy.

The verdict: Dairy may be a beneficial component of a muscle-building or sports recovery regimen if consumed in moderation.

Bone health and osteoporosis

It’s not only about minerals when it comes to bone health; it’s also about eating adequate protein and triggering biochemical signals that instruct bones to remain dense.

Dairy is high in several nutrients that are beneficial to bone health, including:

  • calcium
  • phosphorus
  • protein
  • magnesium
  • vitamin D
  • vitamin K2

Dairy intake promotes or preserves bone health, while also helping to prevent or delay bone loss, according to the overwhelming majority of studies conducted over the last 40 years. This is particularly true for individuals who are physically active and consume a nutritious diet, since these factors all contribute to a strong and healthy skeleton.

While dairy is beneficial to bone health, it is not absolutely necessary.

With or without dairy, you can have a strong and robust skeleton as long as you consume enough essential bone elements (calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K2, protein, and so on) and engage in a bone-building stimulus, such as resistance exercise.

Conversely, even if you consume dairy, you may have low bone density if you eat poorly in general and do not exercise (or if there are other factors involved, such as hormonal issues).

To put it another way, dairy does not have to be a life-or-death situation for bone health. (Did you catch what we did there?)

The verdict: Dairy intake may benefit bone health in general. Without dairy, though, you can receive adequate calcium and other bone-friendly minerals.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a condition that affect

According to new study, there is no link between the use of dairy products and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke.

Dairy is often linked to a small reduction in risk (especially for stroke). This includes full-fat dairy, which has been linked to a lower incidence of heart disease in places where cows are routinely grass-fed (such as Australia). However, owing to differing farming methods in the United States, this connection is inconclusive.

Dairy’s fatty acid composition likely influences its behavior (and health consequences) in human bodies. Because an animal’s food has a significant impact on its fatty acid composition, and cultured/fermented dairy seems to behave differently than non-cultured, the link between CVD and dairy is likely to be highly dependent on the animals fed and the kind of dairy consumed.

The verdict: Moderate dairy intake is unlikely to put you at risk for cardiovascular disease or stroke if you are active and consume a well-balanced diet, and may even reduce your risk (depending what dairy you choose).

Cancer

The most complete collection of information on the connections between dairy foods, red meat, and processed meat and different diseases is provided by the newly revised publications from the World Cancer Research Fund International and the American Institute for Cancer Research.

The findings add to the growing body of evidence showing dairy products and milk are linked to a lower risk of colorectal cancer and that high milk and dairy consumption is not linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. This is an intriguing update since it was previously claimed that dairy consumption was linked to breast cancer.

Dairy consumption has also been linked to a lower risk of bladder cancer and stomach cancer, as well as a lower risk of pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and lung cancer. They discovered that the data regarding prostate cancer risk is contradictory (which is in line with other research we’ve presented).

It’s worth noting that the overwhelming majority of this study is observational, which means it can’t completely anticipate real cause-and-effect connections.

It’s also worth noting that, even when dairy consumption is linked to an elevated risk of cancer, the total estimated contribution of dairy to cancer risk is negligible. Much bigger factors, such as smoking, obesity, alcohol, inactivity, and sun exposure, dwarf dairy.

The verdict: Current research suggests that total dairy consumption does not raise the risk of many kinds of cancer, although more study is needed in this area.

Allergies, sensitivities, and intolerances to dairy products

Dairy intolerance is a real thing for some individuals. You may already know whether you’re one of them. Dairy allergies, intolerances, and sensitivities, on the other hand, aren’t usually so obvious.

Here’s what they are, how to tell if you have them, and what they imply for you and your dairy.

Dairy intolerance

An allergy is characterized by a specific immunological reaction that occurs quickly.

If you have a dairy allergy, you will most likely have symptoms not just in your digestive system, but also in your skin, respiratory system, mouth and throat, and other areas. Itching, swelling, hives, and even breathing difficulties are all possibilities.

If you’ve experienced a response to dairy like this, talk to your doctor about allergy testing. An elimination diet is also an option. Allergies to dairy products are most prevalent in youngsters, but they may also affect adults.

You should avoid dairy if you have a dairy allergy.

Lactose intolerance is a condition in which a person is unable to digest

Lactose (a monosaccharide) and galactose (a monosaccharide) are simple sugars found in milk (a disaccharide of glucose and galactose).

Some of us can easily digest these carbohydrates, while others cannot.

Lactase and galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase, the enzymes that break down lactose and galactose, respectively, are required for this. This is contingent on:

  • our age (we may digest milk sugars better while we’re younger);
  • our microbial habitat or gut health; and
  • the beneficial microorganisms found in fermented dairy products

Lactose travels undigested into the big intestine if we are unable to digest it correctly. Gas, bloating, stomach pains, and diarrhea result from the fermentation process. It was a good time.

Galactosemia is a hereditary disease in which humans are unable to absorb galactose correctly. This is a more severe condition for which newborn infants may be tested.

Humans have continuously developed to fulfill the needs of their dietary environment as biological creatures, and numerous groups of people across the globe have independently acquired the capacity to digest lactose (known as lactase persistence). In most instances, these people (such as northern Europeans or East Africans) have been dairy farmers for generations.

Lactose intolerant individuals, on the other hand, may be able to:

  • dairy products that aren’t produced by cows (such as goat milk);
  • fermented dairy products (such as kefir);
  • low-lactose dairy products (such as cheese); and/or
  • If they take probiotics or lactase supplements, they will be able to digest dairy.

Lactose-free dairy products are also available.

Keep a thorough food diary that monitors your symptoms, or attempt an elimination diet, to see whether you have lactose intolerance.

If you have a lactose intolerance, you may try a variety of foods to discover what you can handle. If your symptoms continue, stay away from dairy.

Other forms of dairy intolerance

Some individuals are lactose intolerant, however this isn’t the case for everyone. They may be intolerant or sensitive to anything else in milk, such as casein, whey, or other immunoglobulins (proteins).

When our immune system responds to a component of milk, we may have stomach symptoms as well as other food intolerance signs including inflammation, rashes and pimples on the skin, irritated nasal passages, and so on.

The same procedure as for lactose intolerance is used to determine dairy sensitivity and intolerance: Try an elimination diet or keep a thorough food diary that monitors your symptoms.

Only you can determine whether a piece of pizza or a dish of ice cream once in a while is worth the possible stomach pain. Make your choice with your eyes wide open, knowing the tradeoffs, and based on your objectives and beliefs.

If you have a different kind of dairy allergy, try a variety of foods to discover what you can handle. If your symptoms continue, stay away from dairy.

What is the relationship between dairy farming and milk processing?

Dairy farming: organic vs. conventional

Many individuals believe that organic food is superior than non-organic food.

In some respects, this is correct.

Organic dairy comes from cows that are fed better, since it comes from cows who eat only organic feed and graze on pasture for at least 120 days each year, giving at least 30% of their diet during that time.

It’s important to note that organic does not imply that cows are exclusively fed grass and hay. Grain and other feed may still be given to them as long as they are organically produced. Nonetheless, at least half of the animals’ diet comes from pasture, according to the majority of organic dairies.

What difference does it make? As we’ve seen, nutrition has a significant impact on dairy quality.

The quantity of grass available to cows may have an impact on the protein, fat, and carbohydrate composition of their milk. Healthy animals that spend the majority of their time outside on fresh pasture eating plenty of grass supplemented with hay, root vegetables, and grains produce the most nutritious dairy.

Cows that have not been administered hormones or antibiotics will also produce organic dairy.

Antibiotics are a source of worry since the medicines used by some farmers to prevent infections in cows are also used to treat illnesses in people. Antibiotic resistance is already a major issue, therefore ingesting small quantities of antibiotics in milk may exacerbate the situation.

Bovine growth hormone (bGH) is occasionally used by traditional farmers to enhance milk output, as we discussed previously. Despite the fact that this hormone has not been proven to have any negative effects on humans, organic farmers and animal rights advocates believe it is cruel since it pushes cows to make more milk than they are supposed to and may raise the risk of infection, requiring antibiotics.

However, keep in mind that organic milk still contain hormones, although in lower quantities. This is something that all milk does (including human breast milk).

Pasteurization and homogenization are two terms that are used interchangeably.

To make raw milk safe for human consumption, it is processed. Unless refrigerated, it ferments, and germs and viruses may be transferred from animals to people during handling.

Pasteurization kills germs by heating milk in a vat to temperatures that they cannot withstand.

Homogenization reduces the size of milk fat globules, preventing them from rising to the top and forming a cream layer. This aids in the mixing of fat-soluble vitamins like A and D.

When it comes to health, processing milk may occasionally result in increased lactose levels. This is one of the reasons why some people advocate for raw milk, despite the fact that the danger of milk-borne illness rises dramatically when milk is stored raw.

Importantly, the danger of bacterial infection from raw milk exceeds any possible health risks associated with pasteurization. Raw milk regularly killed people, particularly children, before the introduction of current food safety procedures and pasteurization.

Nerdy fact: It wasn’t until the 1930s when homogenization gained traction, thanks to the introduction of cardboard and opaque milk cartons. Consumers used to judge the richness and attractiveness of milk by looking at the cream line, which was visible through glass bottles.

Concerns about the environment and ethics

Some individuals avoid dairy consumption for ethical and/or environmental grounds.

Livestock farming is complicated all over the globe. Animal goods, on average, need more inputs (water, feed, energy, etc.) and generate more damaging outputs than agricultural products like tubers and legumes (waste, greenhouse gas emissions, etc.)

This isn’t always the case, however, since it relies a lot on the kind of land utilized for cattle grazing and feed production. Even yet, most dairy products in industrialized nations originate from concentrated animal feeding operations (farms where animals are kept in confinement), which may be detrimental to the environment and are considered cruel by animal rights advocates.

This isn’t to say that non-dairy alternatives are always “good”; for example, there have been some worries about water depletion from almond cultivation, which is, of course, used to make almond milk. Some non-dairy “milk” alternatives are more environmentally friendly than others. (See Andrews R. Eating to Prevent the Apocalypse April 2017 for a more in-depth look at this.)

In summary, environmental and ethical issues are valid reasons to avoid dairy if you care deeply about them, but if you’re looking for genuinely ethical and/or ecologically sustainable alternatives, do your homework first.

What does this all imply for you?

Begin by posing a few questions to yourself.

1. What is most important to me?

You may be concerned with longevity, increasing muscle mass, resolving a health problem, sustainable agriculture, finding a handy snack that the kids will eat, or any number of other values, objectives, and priorities while making food choices.

You may love cheese so much that you’ll eat it even if it makes you sick because you’ve concluded that life isn’t worth living without a nice Camembert.

There is no such thing as a “correct” decision. There are only options that work for you in some way.

2. What works best for me as a person?

Your body is unique. Your life is one of a kind.

You may or may not be able to tolerate dairy. It’s up to you whether you like it or not.

It’s all up to you.

3. How does this fit into my regular routine? What do I like to do?

Your food choices will be shaped by your routine and everyday life, whether you’re feeding yourself or a whole family, whether you’re a road warrior or a homebody, whether you’re a hard-training athlete or a couch potato.

Greek yogurt may be easy to store in the office fridge; whey protein may be a handy and portable sports supplement; a latte may keep you satiated while you’re on the move and can’t obtain solid food; goat cheese or Parmesan may enhance the flavor of a salad, and so on.

Dairy may be consumed in a variety of ways and for a variety of reasons… or not.

4. What are some of the things I’m discovering about myself?

Start maintaining a food symptom diary if you suspect you have a dairy intolerance. Observe as much as you can, including what you ate, when you ate it, and any bodily symptoms you’re feeling.

Look for trends throughout time.

5. How do you determine what is reasonable?

Keep your wits about you. Don’t get too worked up over finding the “ideal” option or “following the rules.”

Simply strive to make better choices (whatever you define them) whenever possible, and leave the rest to chance.

If you can handle and like dairy, moderate intake (1 to 3 servings per day) is usually acceptable, particularly if one or two of those servings are yogurt or other cultured/fermented dairy products, and if the dairy is consumed as part of a balanced diet.

Food choices are more of a continuum at PN than a set of “does and don’ts.” Here’s how it could look in the dairy industry:

If we think of food choices as continuums, this is what it might look like for dairy

If you do decide to consume dairy, keep the following in mind:

Recognize the distinctions between dairy products.

If you want to maintain dairy in your life, learn about the many kinds of dairy and try them out. Try goat or sheep milk-based goods (or give that Mongolian yak butter tea a shot).

Make fermented / cultured dairy a regular part of your diet.

Yogurt, kefir, skyr, quark, aged cheeses, and other fermented and cultured dairy products seem to be the healthiest choices.

Pay attention to the labeling.

Many kinds of dairy are highly processed, including a lot of sugar, salt, and other ingredients you don’t want in your diet. Although frozen yogurt seems to be nutritious, it is essentially the same as ice cream in terms of health.

Keep everything in context.

It’s not necessary to be flawless when it comes to eating healthily and achieving your objectives.

So, if you decide to continue eating dairy, bear in mind that, although certain kinds of dairy are more health-promoting than others, indulging every now and again is OK – even beneficial.

Don’t worry if you resolve to give up dairy and then fail.

In any case, indulge in that ice cream, cheddar cheese, or anything else you want. Enjoy it, and then return to your regular schedule.

If you don’t want to consume dairy, you can:

If you’re allergic to dairy, have a dairy intolerance or sensitivity, have ethical or environmental concerns about dairy, or just don’t want to consume it…

Cool.

Dairy is not required for good health.

Other sources of nutrients may be used to supplement your diet.

Plan your meals to include adequate protein, minerals, and other nutrients.

If you need assistance, seek it.

Consider receiving coaching (and/or contacting your health care provider as required) if you need additional help identifying and investigating food sensitivities, buying and understanding food labels, creating a meal that fits your choices, or any other nutritional issue.

If you’re a coach facing dairy-related questions from clients or patients, here’s what you should say:

On average, the known health advantages of dairy much exceed the potential risks, according to the existing data (read: not yet conclusive).

Individuals, on the other hand, are not study averages. Each individual must assess how dairy affects them and decide whether it is appropriate for them. That’s a positive thing. People must feel in control of their own destiny.

Clients should not be subjected to theoretical arguments, rigid “rules,” or intimidation. Instead, gently guide them through the conversation. Encourage them to maintain a food diary and become their own scientist by encouraging them to keep a food diary.

Look to strengthen your coaching connection by better understanding your client’s point of view and assisting them in feeling in charge of their decisions.

Do you want to be the healthiest, fittest, and strongest version of yourself?

Most people are aware that getting enough exercise, eating properly, sleeping well, and managing stress are all essential for looking and feeling better. However, they need assistance in putting that information into practice in the context of their hectic, often stressful lives.

Over the last 15 years, we’ve utilized the Coaching approach to assist over 100,000 customers lose weight, gain strength, and improve their health… over the long haul… no matter what obstacles they face.

It’s also why, via our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs, we educate health, fitness, and wellness professionals how to coach their own clients through similar difficulties.

Interested in becoming a coach? Join the presale list to save up to 54% and get a seat 24 hours before the general public.

On Wednesday, July 14th, 2021, we will be accepting applications for our upcoming Coaching.

If you’re interested in learning more about coaching, I recommend signing up for our presale list below. Being on the list provides you with two distinct benefits.

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Ayers T, Grass J, Lynch M, Angulo FJ, Mahon BE. Langer AJ, Ayers T, Grass J, Lynch M, Angulo FJ, Mahon BE. United States, 1993–2006: nonpasteurized dairy products, illness outbreaks, and state legislation. Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 18, No. 3, March 2012, p. 385.

Santillo A, Albenzio M, Mollakhalili N, Mortazavian AM, Nascimento JS, Silva MC, Freitas MQ, Balthazar CF, Pimentel TC, Ferrao LL, Almada CN, Almada CN, Santillo A, Albenzio M, Mollakhalili N, Mortazavian AM, Nascimento JS, Silva Sheep milk’s physicochemical properties and use in the creation of functional foods Food Science and Food Safety: A Comprehensive Review Mar 2017;16(2):247-62.

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There are so many reasons to love dairy, but there are also quite a few reasons to hate it, and for a long time it was hard to tell which was which. That is, until the last few decades, when the world’s most prominent health authorities started to take the dairy industry to task for its apparent icky associations. That’s when the dairy industry, which in many ways has never been more powerful, suddenly had to justify its offerings to the general public. “Dairy Is Good For You” and similar headlines were created in response.. Read more about pros and cons of dairy farming and let us know what you think.

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